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Contact Lenses

Multifocal Contact Lenses For People Over 40

If your 40th birthday has come and gone, you may have started to notice some changes in your vision. You might find yourself holding written material further away from your face in order to clearly read the fine print, or have a harder time adjusting your focus from distant objects to near ones.

The inability to see things clearly at various distances can be frustrating.   

Fortunately, this problem can be solved by wearing multifocal contact lenses. Below, we’ll explain the cause and symptoms of presbyopia, along with the many benefits of wearing multifocal contact lenses.

What Is Presbyopia? 

Presbyopia is the natural and gradual loss of your eyes’ ability to focus on near objects. 

The crystalline lens in your eye focuses light onto the retina, and it adapts its shape depending on what you focus on. From infancy until your late 30s or early 40s, the lens is usually clear, thin and very flexible, allowing fast adjustments for sharp vision at all distances.

From age 40-50 the lens becomes considerably thicker and much less flexible. This makes it harder for the lens to change shape and to accurately refract light when focusing on near objects. 

This farsightedness can be easily corrected with reading glasses, bifocal or multifocal glasses, monovision contact lenses, as well as multifocal contact lenses. 

Multifocal Contact Lenses for Presbyopia

Multifocal contact lenses contain multiple lens powers to provide vision correction for different visual zones so you can clearly see objects that are in the distance, nearby and everything in between. 

Certain multifocal contact lenses have 2 lens powers (bifocals), for near and distance vision, and others have a more gradual power change, similar to progressive lenses. These contact lenses can be made using soft materials or rigid gas-permeable materials, and are available as daytime or extended night-wear lenses. 

Note that multifocal contact lenses are not perfect for all situations and some patients may need to try several brands or designs before finding one that works well for them. To spare you the confusion, your optometrist will guide you towards the ones best suited to your eyes and lifestyle needs. 

To discover options beyond reading glasses, call Eyeworks in Ft. Worth to schedule your contact lens consultation today!

Q&A: 

#1: Are there any “cons” related to wearing multifocal contact lenses? 

Many multifocal contact lenses use a “simultaneous vision” design that allows seeing far and near simultaneously through concentric zones. Some people have problems adapting to this, noticing hazy vision and less contrast than single vision lenses. You can ask your optometrist to be fit with multifocal lenses and get a test run” or trial period.  

#2: When does presbyopia stabilize?

Most people will start to develop age-related vision changes starting in their early to mid-40s. At around 60 years of age, your eyesight will begin to stabilize and you’ll notice less of a need to update your lens prescription. Nonetheless, yearly comprehensive eye exams at this age are more important than ever, as they enable your eye doctor to detect potential eye conditions and diseases early on. 

Pros and Cons of Implantable Contact Lenses

The Implantable Collamer Lens (ICL), or Implantable Contact Lens as it is commonly called, is an alternative to laser vision correction surgery. It offers similar benefits as standard external contact lenses, but with a difference.

The main difference is that the ICL is implanted inside the eye, between the iris and the natural lens. The ICL does not replace the eye’s natural lens, but is specially shaped to help correct vision problems such as farsightedness, nearsightedness, and astigmatism.

Below we’ll discuss some of the pros and cons of the ICL to help you understand who would best benefit from this procedure.

Pros of ICLs

Implantable contact lens (ICL) surgery is an effective, safe, and quick procedure that offers long-term vision correction. ICL surgery benefits include:

Minimally Invasive – An ICL procedure requires only a microscopic incision, without the need for stitches. It’s a short procedure, with minimal downtime afterward.

Excellent Visual Quality – The quality of vision is excellent with ICL, because the eye maintains a natural corneal shape, especially with higher prescriptions.

No Dry Eye – During ICL implantation, the corneal nerves are not disrupted, as happens with laser refractive surgery (LASIK). This helps patients avoid the dry eye syndrome commonly experienced after laser surgery

Good for Patients Ineligible for LASIK – Thin or irregular corneas, very high prescriptions, large pupils, and dry eye syndrome, can all disqualify someone from LASIK surgery. An ICL is a great alternative if you have been told you should not have LASIK due to any of these issues.

Completely Reversible – The ICL can be removed or replaced in the event of problems or a change in a patient’s vision, giving you the option to undergo another vision correction procedure, if needed.

Cons of ICLs

The risks of the implantable contact lens are very low, but it’s important to know its limitations.

It’s Not for Everyone – The ICL is primarily meant for those in the 18-50 age group. The eyes of children under 18 are still developing, and if you’re over 50, your eyes are also changing and may soon develop cataracts, a natural clouding of your lens.

Insurance Coverage is Unlikely – An ICL will most likely not be covered by most insurance plans as it is considered a cosmetic procedure. An ICL is custom-made for each individual, making it more expensive per eye than LASIK.

Regular Check-Ups – ICL’s are intended to stay in place indefinitely. However, it is still recommended to have regular appointments to ensure that the implants are in position and functioning properly. These appointments are also an opportunity for your eye doctor to check for premature cataracts or increased pressure in your eye.

Will ICL Work for Me?

We know that surgery can be nerve-racking but be reassured that the ICL process is done as smoothly and efficiently as possible. ICL is just another advanced surgery option to treat and improve your vision.

If you are currently looking into different corrective vision procedures, we suggest you schedule an appointment with Eyeworks in Ft. Worth. We can provide you with information about ICL and see if it best suits your needs.

At Eyeworks, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 817-346-7077 or book an appointment online to see one of our Ft. Worth eye doctors.

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How To Prevent Your Lenses From Scratching

If you wear glasses, then you know what a nuisance a scratched lens can be. Scratched or chipped lenses can interfere with your vision, making glasses uncomfortable to wear. Here’s what we recommend to keep your lenses scratch-free.

How to Avoid Scratching Your Lenses

Use a Protective Case

Using a sturdy eyeglass case will prolong the life of your lenses. No matter what kind of glasses you wear — standard, sunglasses, bifocal — you’ll want to protect them.

Be sure to choose a hard case with a soft inner lining and always have one on hand, either in your purse, backpack, or car.

When placing the glasses in their case, make sure the lenses are facing downwards, as this can reduce the risk of them being scratched. Additionally, avoid putting anything else in the case along with the glasses, especially sharp or metal objects.

Choose Anti-Scratch Lenses

Although no lenses are completely scratch-proof, there are certain coatings that can be added to the front and back of your lenses to make them more scratch resistant. Many lenses already come with this option, but sometimes it’s an optional addition. Anti-scratch coatings are particularly helpful for children’s glasses.

Remove Your Glasses Carefully

Handle your glasses by the temples (arms) and not the rims. This way, your fingers avoid the frame and lens area altogether, reducing the chance of inadvertently scratching them. Additionally, holding them by the temples with both hands ensures a better grip, so you’ll be less likely to drop them.

Set Them Down Properly

Never put glasses down with the lenses facing downward, unless it’s into a lens case. If you need to put them down and don’t have a case, rest them with the temples open and upside down — glasses tend to be more stable in this position.

Avoid placing them in a place where they’ll be easily knocked over or splashed on, like near a sink. Setting them down in the same place consistently will also reduce your risk of losing them.

Use the Right Lens Cleaner

It’s all too common for people to wipe their glasses with their clothing or other abrasive material. Doing so can scratch the lenses, especially if they’re dry.

Always clean your lenses with a soft microfiber cloth and specialized lens cleaning solution, items your optometrist’s office can provide.

When to Visit Your Optometrist

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to completely prevent your lenses from ever becoming scratched over their lifetime. Once they are scratched, there is little that can be done to repair the lenses. Most of the time the lenses need to be replaced.

At Eyeworks, we offer a wide array of frames and lenses, so you’re sure to find a pair to suit your eyes and needs.

Call Eyeworks in to schedule your eye exam or with any further questions.

At Eyeworks, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 817-346-7077 or book an appointment online to see one of our Ft. Worth eye doctors.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Richard Chu, D.O.

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses breaks, they can shatters into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Fort Worth, Texas. Visit EYEWORKS for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

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REFERENCES

https://www.southparkoptical.com/how-to-avoid-scratches-on-your-glasses

https://www.allaboutvision.com/eyeglasses/how-to-clean-glasses.htm#:~:text=To%20avoid%20scratches%2C%20blow%20any,you%20clean%20the%20cloths%20frequently

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-remove-scratches-from-glasses

Are Contact Lenses Safe For Young Children?

Here’s a question we often get at our practice: ‘Is my child too young for contact lenses?’ This is an important question, and the answer may surprise you.

For children with myopia (nearsightedness), contact lenses can be a convenient method of vision correction. It allows kids to go about their day without having to worry about breaking or misplacing their glasses, and enables them to freely participate in sports and other physical activities.

Some children and young teens may ask their parents for contact lenses because they feel self-conscious wearing glasses. Contact lenses may even provide children with the confidence boost they need to come out of their shell. Moreover, these days, it is very popular for children to wear single-use one-day disposable soft contacts, since there is no cleaning or maintenance involved.

Some parents may deny their child’s request for contacts due to concerns about eye health and safety. There’s no reason to worry: contact lenses are just as safe for children as they are for anyone else.

At Eyeworks, we provide children, teens, and patients of all ages with a wide variety of contact lenses. If you’re concerned about the safety of contacts for your child, we’ll be happy to explain and explore ways to ensure maximum safety, optimal eye health and comfort. To learn more or to schedule a pediatric eye exam for contact lenses, contact us today.

What Are the Risks of Having My Child Wear Contact Lenses?

A study published in the January 2021 issue of The Journal of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics found that kids aren’t at a higher risk of experiencing contact lens complications.

The study followed nearly 1000 children aged 8-16 over the course of 1.5-3 years to determine how contact lenses affected their eye health.

The results indicate that age doesn’t have an effect on contact lens safety. In fact, the researchers found that the risk of developing infections or other adverse reactions was less than 1% per year of wear — which is comparable to contact lens wearers of other ages.

But before you decide that contact lenses are right for your child, you may want to consider whether your child is ready to wear them. During his or her eye doctor’s appointment, the optometrist may ask about your child’s level of maturity, responsibility, and personal hygiene. Since many children are highly motivated to wear contacts, they tend to display real maturity in caring for their lenses. That said, in the initial stages, parents may need to play an active role, as their child gets used to inserting and removing the new contact lenses.

It’s important to note that just as with any other medical device, contact lenses are not risk-free. Anyone who wears contact lenses has a chance of developing eye infections or other complications with contact lenses. However, when worn and cared for according to your eye doctor’s instructions, contact lenses are low-risk and perfectly safe for children and teenagers.

So, go ahead and bring your child in for a contact lens consultation! We’ll help determine if your child is ready for contacts and answer any questions you or your child may have. To schedule your child’s contact lens fitting or eye exam, contact Eyeworks in Ft. Worth today.

Contact Lenses Vs Laser Eye Surgery

Contact lenses can be used to correct vision problems including short-sightedness, long-sightedness and astigmatism. While laser eye surgery can reduce your dependence on glasses or contact lenses significantly, or even eradicate the need for them altogether. Read on to learn more about the benefits of contact lenses and laser eye surgery.

Contact lenses

Benefits of contact lenses

  • If you don’t like wearing glasses, or don’t feel that they suit you, contact lenses can provide an alternative.
  • Contacts provide a better field of view than glasses – Contact lenses conform to the curvature of the eye, so you won’t have frames getting in the way of your vision.
  • Freedom to be more active – Contact lenses are less restrictive than glasses when it comes to activities such as playing sports.

Disadvantages of wearing contact lenses

  • You’ll have to get used to putting them in – If you don’t like touching your eyes, contact lenses may not be the best option for you.
  • There’s a risk of infection – To keep the risk of infection to a minimum, you’ll need to ensure that you clean your lenses thoroughly, or use daily disposable lenses.
  • They’re inconvenient – Contact lenses can fall out and get lost easily. You’ll also need to remember to carry spare lenses and cleaning fluid around with you.

Laser eye surgery

Benefits of laser eye surgery

  • A long-term solution – The changes made to your eyes during the treatment will be permanent, and although your vision may still change over time, laser eye surgery offers a much longer lasting solution than other forms of vision correction.
  • Increased freedom – If you choose laser eye surgery, you’ll be able to step out of the house without having to worry about carrying your glasses.
  • Less risk of infection – If you choose laser eye surgery instead, once your eyes have healed you’ll be able to avoid these risks.

Potential disadvantages of laser eye surgery

  • Dry eyes – You might find that your eyes feel slightly dry and uncomfortable immediately after your treatment. Your surgeon will give you eye drops to help combat this, and it should soon pass once your eyes heal.
  • Your vision might not be perfect – Laser eye surgery can help improve your vision significantly, but you might still find that you need glasses for some tasks, such as reading small print or driving at night.
  • Glare or halo effect – You might find that you experience some glare or ‘halo effect’ after having treatment. This usually reduces significantly in the first few weeks after treatment, and continues to improve over the first three months.

To learn more about your options, contact Eyeworks and schedule an appointment today!

At Eyeworks, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 817-346-7077 or book an appointment online to see one of our Ft. Worth eye doctors.

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What You Need to Know About Getting Contact Lenses for Kids

If your child wants to wear contact lenses instead of glasses, should you allow it? That’s a question many parents ask our eye doctors when visiting us for a kids eye exam in Ft. Worth, Southlake, and Downtown. While the question may be typical, the answer is highly individual. Here’s a review of what you need to consider.

Is your child ready for contact lenses?

There isn’t a set age for when contact lenses are suitable for kids. Rather, it depends on the child’s maturity and ability to be careful. Does your child:

  • Do chores without being nagged?
  • Understand the benefits of contact lenses
  • Show that he or she can follow the eye doctor’s instructions, day after day

It all comes down to whether your child can take responsibility for wearing contact lenses safely, following the recommended wearing schedule and proper hygiene.

What are the advantages of contact lenses for kids?

  • Clearer vision
  • Wider field of vision
  • More convenient and comfortable for playing sports
  • Self-esteem booster for kids who feel self-conscious about how they look in glasses

What are the disadvantages of contact lenses?

  • Higher risk of eye infections and irritation
  • More intense daily maintenance
  • Might not be a good choice for kids with seasonal allergies (but some doctors say they’re better, especially if they wear daily disposables!)

What rules do kids need to know about contact lenses?

If you sense that your child is ready, and a kids eye exam determines that your child’s vision condition could be treated efficiently with contact lenses, it’s best to review the rules to confirm that your child knows what he or she is getting into!

  • Correct handling and disinfection
  • Replacing contacts on schedule
  • Using only sterile solutions
  • Application of makeup after inserting lenses
  • Removal of contacts at first sign of irritation

To find out which type of contacts lenses are best for your child, book a kids eye exam in Ft. Worth, Southlake, and Downtown

At Eyeworks, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 817-346-7077 or book an appointment online to see one of our Ft. Worth eye doctors.

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The Importance of Eye Exams for Contact Lenses

Are you planning on wearing contact lenses for the first time? Do you need a new contact lens prescription? Are your current contacts not as comfortable as you wish they were? Your eye doctor will perform a contact lens eye exam to ensure that your vision with contacts is clear, comfortable, and safe, providing you with the right lenses for you.

What is a contact lens exam?

If you wear or want to wear contact lenses, you’ll need an eye exam for contact lenses, in addition to your regular comprehensive eye exam. Special tests are performed during a contact lens exam to evaluate your eyes and vision with contacts.

Are eyeglass prescriptions the same as contact lens prescriptions?

No, a prescription for glasses cannot be used for contact lenses. An eyeglass prescription is for lenses that are positioned approximately 12 millimeters from your eyes, whereas a contact lens prescription is measured for lenses that sit directly on the surface of your eye.

The prescription for contact lenses also includes the brand, lens diameter and curvature, which are not part of an eyeglass prescription.

Contact lenses fitting: One size does not fit all

One contact lens size doesn’t fit all eyes. If a contact lens is too flat or too steep for your corneal shape, you may experience discomfort or even eye damage. Your eye doctor will take certain measurements to determine the best contact lens design and fit for your eyes.

Corneal curvature

This measures the curvature of your eye’s clear front surface (cornea) so the eye doctor can select the optimal curve and diameter for your contact lenses. If your eye’s surface is somewhat irregular because of astigmatism or other conditions, you may require a special lens.

Pupil and iris size

The size of your pupil and iris (the colored part of your eye) is also important in determining the best contact lens design.

Tear film evaluation

This test evaluates the quality of your tears, to determine whether they will be able to keep contact lenses and your cornea sufficiently hydrated throughout the day. If you have dry eye disease, standard contact lenses may not be right for you.

Trial lenses

Following the eye exam, you will be provided with trial lenses to verify that the chosen contact lenses offer clear and comfortable vision. This will allow the eye doctor to make any fine adjustments to the prescription.

Contact Lens Eye Exam Near You

Wearing the correct contact lenses for your eyes allows you to enjoy all of the benefits of wearing contacts, while keeping your eyes healthy and comfortable.

If you’re already a contact lens wearer, visit your eye doctor at least once a year to make sure the lenses are still providing you with optimum vision and comfort.

Contact Eyeworks in Ft. Worth to book your contact lens eye exam today!

New To Contact Lenses? Here Are Our Top 5 Tips!

For an estimated 56 million North Americans, contact lenses are the preferred form of vision correction. So if you’ve just started wearing contact lenses — you’re in good company.

Advice About Contact Lenses from Ft. Worth Eye Doctor: Dr. Richard Chu

Here are 5 tips to quickly help you adjust to wearing and caring for your new lenses so you can enjoy the many benefits they offer.

  1. Learn How to Tell if Your Contact Lens Is Inside Out

This is a common mistake many beginners make when inserting soft contacts. Place the lens on  your index fingertip and look carefully at its shape. The edge of the lens should be pointing upwards, like the rim of a teacup. If the edge is flared outward like a blooming flower, the lens is inside out.

Some contact lenses have tiny laser markings of numbers or letters. If the numbers/letters read correctly when you hold the lens on your fingertip, they are properly oriented and the lens is ready to be inserted.

  1. Never Use a Substitute for Contact Lens Solution

Your eye doctor will recommend the appropriate contact lens solution to suit your eyes and lenses. Some people have sensitivities and not all lens solutions are the same. 

Even if you run out of contact lens solution, don’t be tempted to rinse your lenses with water, and never use saliva to moisten or clean them.

Using substances other than the recommended contact lens solution to rinse or rewet your contacts can introduce harmful microbes to the eye and cause a serious infection. That’s why it’s best to remove your contacts before showering, swimming, or any other time they might get wet.

  1. If Your Contact Lenses Feel Uncomfortable, Take Them Out!

Some newcomers mistakenly think that if their contacts feel uncomfortable or gritty, they simply need to “get used to them.” Contact lenses are supposed to be comfortable, so if you are experiencing discomfort there may be something wrong.

With clean fingers, remove your contacts and rinse them, inside and out, with the solution or rewetting drops as recommended by your eye doctor. Dust or dirt could have gotten stuck between the lens and your eye, causing irritation. Flushing the lenses with contact lens solution will help remove the irritant.

If your eyes still feel irritated, don’t place the contact lenses back in your eyes. Instead, wait until they are no longer red or irritated, and try inserting them again. If the problem persists, contact your eye doctor.

  1. Wear Contact Lens-Friendly Makeup

Wearing makeup around the eyes can be a source of irritation and infection whether you wear contact lenses or not. Here’s what we recommend when it comes to eye makeup and contact lenses:

  • Choose hypoallergenic makeup.
  • If using a cream-based product around your eyes, choose a water-based formula instead of an oil-based one. 
  • Keep your eye closed during application to avoid makeup particles entering your eye. 
  • Don’t apply eyeliner or eyeshadow to the inner rims of your eyelids.
  • Replace eye makeup at least once every 3 months to minimize the growth and spread of bacteria.
  • Never share eye makeup with friends or family.
  • Remove your contact lenses before removing your makeup.
  1. Stick to the Hygiene Guidelines

We can’t emphasize this enough — always thoroughly wash and dry your hands before handling your contact lenses.

Try to avoid washing your hands with oily or heavily scented hand soaps, as they tend to cling to the surface of the lens and could irritate the eye. Additionally, if you touch moisturizers or lotions before handling your contact lenses you run the risk of some residual product adhering to the lens and clouding your vision.

After washing your hands, dry them using a lint-free towel. It’s harder to grasp contact lenses with wet hands, and — as mentioned above — lenses shouldn’t come into contact with tap water.

Bonus Tip: Get an Eye Exam

While all this advice can be very helpful, it doesn’t replace an in-person exam with your eye doctor.  Your eye doctor will advise you when to return for your next contact lens consultation. Following this schedule is the best way to ensure you can enjoy the freedom of contact lens wear.

If you are new to contact lenses (or not!) and have any questions or concerns about your eyes or vision, call 817-346-7077. Eyeworks will be happy to schedule you for a contact lens exam and fitting.

With the help of Dr. Richard Chu, you’ll be an expert in contact lens wear and care in no time!

What You Need to Know About Getting Contact Lenses for Kids

If your child wants to wear contact lenses instead of glasses, should you allow it? That’s a question many parents ask our eye doctors when visiting us for a kids eye exam in Ft. Worth, Southlake, and Downtown. While the question may be typical, the answer is highly individual. Here’s a review of what you need to consider.

Is your child ready for contact lenses?

There isn’t a set age for when contact lenses are suitable for kids. Rather, it depends on the child’s maturity and ability to be careful. Does your child:

  • Do chores without being nagged?
  • Understand the benefits of contact lenses
  • Show that he or she can follow the eye doctor’s instructions, day after day

It all comes down to whether your child can take responsibility for wearing contact lenses safely, following the recommended wearing schedule and proper hygiene.

What are the advantages of contact lenses for kids?

  • Clearer vision
  • Wider field of vision
  • More convenient and comfortable for playing sports
  • Self-esteem booster for kids who feel self-conscious about how they look in glasses

What are the disadvantages of contact lenses?

  • Higher risk of eye infections and irritation
  • More intense daily maintenance
  • Might not be a good choice for kids with seasonal allergies (but some doctors say they’re better, especially if they wear daily disposables!)

What rules do kids need to know about contact lenses?

If you sense that your child is ready, and a kids eye exam determines that your child’s vision condition could be treated efficiently with contact lenses, it’s best to review the rules to confirm that your child knows what he or she is getting into!

  • Correct handling and disinfection
  • Replacing contacts on schedule
  • Using only sterile solutions
  • Application of makeup after inserting lenses
  • Removal of contacts at first sign of irritation

To find out which type of contacts lenses are best for your child, book a kids eye exam in Ft. Worth, Southlake, and Downtown

At Eyeworks, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 817-346-7077 or book an appointment online to see one of our Ft. Worth eye doctors.

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What Are the Benefits of Scleral Lenses?

If you have keratoconus, astigmatism or any type of condition associated with an irregular cornea, your eye doctor may have recommended scleral lenses for vision correction. What are these specialty contact lenses, and what do they have to offer? Our Ft. Worth, Texas, explains.

Intro to scleral lenses

Scleral contact lenses are rigid gas permeable contacts that have an extra-wide diameter that vaults over your entire cornea, resting on the whites of your eye (sclera). In contrast to conventional contacts that fit snugly on the surface of your eye, scleral lenses leave a gap between the lens and corneal surface.

At Eyeworks, our eye doctor may recommend scleral lenses as the best option to give crisp, comfortable vision for many hard-to-fit conditions, including keratoconus and astigmatism. That’s because there’s a lot to be gained from these unique, advanced contact lenses!

A clear view of the advantages of scleral lenses

  • Stable vision: With sclerals, even the most irregular cornea can be transformed into a smooth, rounded surface that provides consistently sharp vision. Their super-size diameter helps keep scleral lenses centered and stable on your eyes, even if you lead an active lifestyle.
  • Durable wear: These rigid gas permeable contacts are made from high quality materials that last. Therefore, although the cost of scleral lenses may be higher than standard contacts, you’ll benefit from maximum value over time.
  • User friendly: People with poor vision or problems with manual dexterity may find it difficult to handle normal contacts. But the x-large size and hard material of scleral lenses simplifies the whole insertion and removal process.
  • Enhanced comfort for dry eyes: When scleral lenses vault over your cornea, they create a pocket that fills with lubricating tears, improving the comfort for wearers – especially if you suffer from dry eyes. All day long, you can enjoy soothing vision.
  • Wider visual field: The optic zones of scleral lenses are wider and more precise than standard contacts, so your peripheral vision is crisper. Sensitivity to light and glare is also reduced.
  • Effective for astigmatism: Particularly if you have high astigmatism, contact lenses may not effectively correct your vision. That’s when scleral lenses can work much better for you.

How to make scleral lenses work for you

For best results, you need an experienced, knowledgeable eye doctor to perform an eye exam and custom-fit you with scleral lenses. Contact our Ft. Worth, Texas, eye care center today to book an appointment!

At Eyeworks, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 817-346-7077 or book an appointment online to see one of our Ft. Worth eye doctors.

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